Gadsdenboro Park Fountain

New Parks for Playing, Relaxing in Charleston


We’re so lucky that in Charleston we have an abundance of lovely parks and green spaces. Visitors love Waterfront Park with fountains and views of the Charleston harbor. White Point Garden is a shaded swath of green space on the Charleston Battery. And there are plenty of small pocket parks tucked away in neighborhoods and along the cobblestone streets of Charleston. Visitors may not be aware of two new parks that opened this spring and summer – both of which are beautiful and offer park-goers two unique experiences.

Gadsdenboro Park

Gadsdenboro Park

Gadsdenboro Park is a spacious green space with sports fields and amenities for all ages, including a walking path, nautical-themed playground, game tables, a bocce court and public restrooms. An ornate fountain with a sculpture of birds taking flight sits at one corner of the park. This park underwent a $5.7 million renovation and re-opened to the public in May 2015. Formerly called Concord Park, Gadsdenboro Park is located across from the Charleston Maritime Center.

Dedicated at the beginning of June was Theodora Park, situated across the street from the soon-to-open Gaillard Center. The City of Charleston and local resident David Rawle contributed to the renovation along with raising private money for the park makeover. Formerly called the Ansonborough Tot Lot, the park was renamed in honor of Rawle’s mother. The renovated park sits at the corner of George and Anson streets.

Theodora Park

Theodora Park

Peaceful and serene, park visitors will see a wrought-iron gate designed and made by Charleston artisan and blacksmith Philip Simmons. They enjoy the tranquil pool crafted with 370 handmade tiles designed by ceramic artist Paul Heroux, whose work is seen in several museum collections.

Charleston fun fact: The city has more than 120 parks and green spaces.

Visiting Marion Square while you’re in Charleston? Be sure to walk along the King Street side of the park to see some plantings by local nonprofit the Charleston Parks Conservancy. This organization and its volunteers turned some drab, empty flower beds into colorful floral masterpieces.

Do you have a favorite Charleston park?